Nashville, Tenn.

Nashville, Tenn. Credit: Kyle Simourd

Project Year:
2013

Focus:
Establishing the importance of the city’s downtown trees to influence future development plans

Scope/Size:
East Nashville

Community ReLeaf planting in Nashville, Tenn.

American Forests staff and volunteers from partner Bank of America plant trees in Nashville, Tenn., as part of Community ReLeaf. Credit: American Forests

Project Description:
This project is assessing the trees in downtown Nashville to quantify the economic and health benefits they provide, such as energy savings, carbon dioxide reduction, air quality benefits and property value increases. In a city that is rapidly expanding, this analysis is critical to help highlight the benefits of the current city trees in order to inform planning for urban forests and development with a goal of maintaining a sustainable and livable city into the future.

Key Findings:

      • East Nashville’s 11,130 street trees provide more than $1 million in cumulative benefits each year. These benefits include:
          • 2,008 tons of CO2 sequestered and 434 tons avoided as a result of reduced energy use.
          • 37.5 million gallons of stormwater intercepted, at a value of more than $370,000, improving water quality and helping protect the Cumberland River.
Community ReLeaf planting in Nashville, Tenn.

Bank of America volunteers plant trees against the Nashville, Tenn., skyline. Credit: Melinda Housholder/American Forests

    • For every dollar invested in East Nashville’s street trees, the community receives $6.91 in benefits.
    • East Nashville’s street trees provide more than 200 acres of canopy cover, shading around 12 percent of streets and sidewalks.
    • The trees’ replacement cost would be more than $48 million.
Community ReLeaf planting in Nashville, Tenn.

American Forests and Bank of America were joined by Hands On Nashville to plant trees in Nashville, Tenn. Credit: American Forests

Tree Planting Event:
On November 3, American Forests and local partners were joined by volunteers from Bank of America to plant trees in Nashville. Read the press release.

How to Support the Urban Forest:
In 2014, we will be adding advocacy tools and other ways that you can encourage the care and maintenance of Nashville’s urban forest. In the meantime, connect with our local partners for more information on the city’s urban forest: