Global ReLeaf Posts on LooseLeaf Blog



2013’s Top 13


by Loose Leaf Contributor
Lush forest.

Today, 2013 comes to an end. Many have said that 13 is an unlucky number, but 2013 hasn’t been all unlucky. After all, it was the year of our 45 millionth Global ReLeaf tree in the ground, a comeback for Siberian tigers, the launch of our Community ReLeaf program and good news for the Kirtland’s warbler. So, before heading into 2014, we’re taking this last chance to embrace the number 13. Here are the 13 Loose Leaf posts of 2013 that you... (Read More)




Moose in the Mire: Part I


by Susan Laszewski

In my home state of Vermont, moose sightings were a regular part of my childhood, but for today’s children they might be a rare treat. Just since 2005, the state’s moose population has nearly halved. Next door neighbor New Hampshire has seen their moose population decline by a third in recent years.

The most likely suspect? Winter ticks. The declines in moose seem to go hand in hand in with surges of the ticks. But what would ca... (Read More)




Monarchs on the Mind


by Susan Laszewski
Monarch on milkweed

So, when I saw Jim Robbins’ recent New York Times article, The Year the Monarch Didn’t Appear, I had mixed feelings. The news the article brought was not good: As of mid-November, only 3 million monarchs had arrived on the scene of their winter habitat in Mexico. Last year, it was 60 million — and even that was low.

On the other hand, it’s good to know that people are paying attention to this problem. Monarch butterflies... (Read More)




History of the Longleaf Pine


by Loose Leaf Team
Red-cockaded woodpecker.

By Lisa Swann

When settlers first came to what is now the southeastern U.S., they were greeted by vast pine forests — the southern longleaf pine. They noticed its spirituality, its majesty, its wildlife and its old growth trees often leaning to one side with weight.

Naturalist John Muir spent time there observing these great forests:

“In ‘pine barrens’ most of the day.  Low, level, sandy tra... (Read More)




Good News for the Bay


by Susan Laszewski
Chesapeake Bay.

In the 23 years since amendments to the Clean Air Act imposed regulations on emissions of nitrogen oxide from power plants, nitrogen deposits in nine Chesapeake Bay area watersheds have declined 34 percent, according to a new study from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, published last month in Environmental Science and Technology. The study’s lead author, Dr. Keith N. Eshleman, tells the Baltimore Sun that the ... (Read More)


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