Global ReLeaf Posts on LooseLeaf Blog



Creeping Away


by Scott Maxham
Japanese white-eye

About 1,700 years ago, humans first arrived on the scene on the island of Hawai’i. Since then, the island’s biodiversity has steadily declined. This is due to several factors: deforestation, humans repurposing land for agriculture and, possibly most detrimental, the introduction of non-native species. And it’s a non-native species that has put a Hawai’ian bird on the brink of extinction.

Non-native plants and animals have been b... (Read More)




Conifers Under Threat


by Susan Laszewski
Whitebark pines. Creid: Bjorn/Flickr

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reports that the latest update to their Red List — a database in which the world’s species are classified according to threat level — includes the first global reassessment of conifers.

In addition to the shelter and food they provide for wildlife, conifers play an important role globally by sequestering carbon. Coniferous forests take three times more carbon out of... (Read More)




Wildlife Refuges Carry on With a Shrinking Budget


by Scott Maxham
Roseate spoonbills, J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge.

Three dollars.

That is the amount of money per acre the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System has to spend to protect the 150 million acres of land under its care. In return, the 561 national wildlife refuges provide America with 34,000 jobs and an estimated $4.2 billion to local economies according to a report released last week by the Cooperative Alliance for Refuge Enhancement (CARE). The report goe... (Read More)




Cell Phones to the Rescue


by Scott Maxham
Agriculture drastically changes the look of Indonesia.

In today’s rapidly evolving society, you can find a cell phone in almost everyone’s pocket. Working at a toy store, I find it amazing how much people are glued to their devices. Even more amazing is that their children are borrowing their phones, and more common than not, they have their own phone to play with. When I was their age, I could only dream of such technology by pretending my folded-up juice box was a phone. So with everyone and... (Read More)




Bald Eagles, From Sea to Shining … Lake


by Susan Laszewski
Bald eagle

I was delighted to read in the USDA blog this month about “Bald Eagles Making a Comeback.”

Anne Poopatanapong, district wildlife biologist for the San Jacinto Ranger District, writes that the pair of bald eagles she has been monitoring for 13 years in California’s Lake Hemet is doing well and has been fruitful. Since 2007, she and volunteer eagle enthusiasts have observed fledgling eagles every year.

It came as no surpr... (Read More)


Critical Issues