The needles of a longleaf pine are long and dark green, and occur in bundles of three.

The needles of a longleaf pine are long and dark green, and occur in bundles of three. Credit: Nicole Castle/Flickr

About the Beidler Forest Longleaf Pine Restoration ReLeaf Project:

Alcoa Foundation, American Forests and Audubon South Carolina are partnering to restore forest areas of South Carolina with 11,600 longleaf pines to improve wildlife habitat in the region.

ReLeaf Location:

Dorchester County, S.C.

Key ReLeaf Activities:

  • Planting 11,600 longleaf pines across 29 acres.
  • Restoring wildlife habitat and a native ecosystem.
  • Creating recreation opportunities.

Why This ReLeaf Project?

The reforestation effort in Dorchester County will greatly improve habitat for native wildlife, including wild turkey and Bachman’s sparrow. Additionally, long-term plans for the site call for a hiking and recreation area for visitors wanting to enjoy a longleaf savannah ecosystem.

Why Longleaf Pine?

Longleaf pine was once a dominant species in the Southeast, but forestry practices and logging have left much of South Carolina with a monoculture pine forest of loblolly. Loblolly is not as conducive, though, to wildlife habitat as longleaf. By planting longleaf pine, this project is restoring wildlife habitat for a variety of species, including white-tailed deer, wild turkey, fox squirrel, bobwhite quail, rattlesnakes and uncommon birds like Bachman’s sparrow and brown-headed nuthatch.