Whitetail doe (Odocoileus virginianus) and fawn, which are a common species in Michigan

Whitetail doe (Odocoileus virginianus) and fawn, which are a common species in Michigan. Credit: James St. John

Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), which is a common species in Michigan

Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), which is a common species in Michigan. Credit: Tim Lenz

Location:
Muskegon County, Mich.

Key Activities:

  • Planting 20,000 trees across 40 acres
  • Restoring wildlife habitat

Project Description:
Alcoa Foundation, American Forests and the Muskegon Conservation District are partnering to plant 20,000 native trees and shrubs across 40 acres in Michigan’s Muskegon County to help restore wildlife habitat.

Why This Project:
For the third year in a row, the Partnership for Trees Program is working with the Muskegon Conservation District to transform barren landscapes in Muskegon County into forested oases for local wildlife. The 20,000 trees being planted as part of this project are providing shelter and food for a variety of animal species, including whitetail deer, beaver, muskrat, raccoons, woodcock, porcupine, cottontail rabbit, various songbirds, ruffed grouse and native pollinators. Beyond the benefits for local wildlife, the project is also increasing recreational space for Muskegon County’s residents.

Why Michigan:
Bordering four of the five Great Lakes, Michigan is the 11th largest state in the country and the ninth most populated. It is home to a number of diverse, protected ecosystems, and has the largest state park and forest system in the country. Michigan’s forests support 150,000 jobs and contribute $12 billion to the state’s economy every year. The state’s three million wildlife watchers spent nearly $1.3 billion in 2012 on their expeditions to view Michigan’s animal species.

Interested in the other Michigan reforestation projects in which we’ve been involved? Check out our Michigan Global ReLeaf projects.