EWF Blog



Younger Trees Better Repel Mountain Pine Beetle


by Loose Leaf Team
whitebark pine killed by mountain pine beetleBy Lisa Swann A new study from researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder shows that younger trees with smoother bark are better at repelling the mountain pine beetle. The epidemic pine beetle attack has spread across western states since 1996, affecting millions of acres of forest, including those in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Colorado doctoral student Scott Ferrenberg, who led the study, noted that the mountain pine b... (Read More)



Moose in the Mire: Part II


by Susan Laszewski
Moose and calf in British Columbia.Yesterday I wrote about the alarming decline of moose populations in the Northeast, especially in Vermont and New Hampshire. There, though many factors may be at play, winter ticks seem to be a primary culprit. But the Northeast is not alone in watching their moose populations decline. It’s been happening across North America, though the causes differ from area to area…or do they? In British Columbia, a report from Wildlife Infometr... (Read More)



Putting Pheromones to Work


by Susan Laszewski
A close-up of a mountain pine beetle.You might expect to find a blog post about how to use pheromones to their full potential on a dating blog, but we’re not talking about human pheromones. We’re talking about beetles. At American Forests, we’ve been using a synthetic version of the pheromone verbenone to repel the destructive mountain pine beetle from whitebark pine. The verbenone patches mimic that which the beetles give off to communicate to other beetles that the tr... (Read More)



Bleak Bear Behavior


by Susan Laszewski
polar bear Images like this one have come to represent the consequences of climate change. The polar bear has become a symbol of the difficulties facing many wildlife species as their habitat continues to change at such a rate that they are often unable to adapt. In the polar bear’s case, as sea ice disappears, they are increasingly facing difficulties finding food. Last week, we were reminded again of what this can mean for human communities as well.... (Read More)



Thanks for Making a Difference


by Susan Laszewski
Photo: Megan Higgs/American ForestsTomorrow is Make a Difference Day and reading the many stories of people volunteering their time and effort to help improve their corner of the world has got me thinking about the many American Forests supporters who have pitched in to help us in our mission of protecting and restoring forests. So, today a note of thanks: Here are just a few of the ways you have made a difference for our forests over the past 12 months: In mid-December last ye... (Read More)