IN THIS ISSUE

Trees and Water in the City

Salmon-saving Trees

Endangered Forest Species

A Forest of Fossils

STANDING TALL: Founding Giants


Trees and Water in the City

Baltimore flooding

Credit: Andy Mangold/Flickr

Each year, America’s cities lose four million trees, which is bad news for our water and our pocketbooks. Trees are vital to helping reduce water pollution and run off from storms. Plus, it’s estimated that healthy trees save cities millions in costs for managing stormwater and air pollution.

Find out how some cities are trying to reverse the decline of their trees.

 

 

 


Salmon-saving Trees

Landingstrip Creek, Washington

Credit: American Forests

Wild salmon are culturally and economically important to the Pacific Northwest, yet their habitat has been severely degraded over time. Facing threats from logging, pollution and poor agricultural practices, the salmon need help to save the streams where they breed and mature. An American Forests director travels into Washington state’s woods to witness how trees are helping salmon prosper.

Journey to Washington state’s salmon-filled streams.

 

 

 


Endangered Forest Species

Spotted owl

Credit: John & Karen Hollingsworth/USFWS

By 2030, more than 4,600 native plant and animal species will have disappeared according to scientific estimates. Sixty percent of those species live in America’s private forestlands in the lower 48 states, leaving landowners struggling to maintain their forests, livelihoods and at-risk species — all at the same time.

Discover how some private forests are protecting its species.

 

 

 


A Forest of Fossils

Fossilized forest

Credit: Ren Yugao

Over the years, people have been fascinated by the fossilized remains of ancient creatures like dinosaurs, but in the last few months, a new player has entered the fossilized world: ancient forests. Scientists have discovered a 385-million-year-old fossilized forest in New York’s Catskill Mountains and a 298-million-year-old one in northern China.

Uncover what scientists are discovering from these ancient remains.

 

 

 


STANDING TALL: Founding Giants

Pennsylvania's Sacred Oak

Courtesy: Pennsylvania Champion Tree Program

As one of the original 13 colonies, there’s a lot of history in Pennsylvania, including old, big trees — one is estimated to be 500 years old!

“I meet many interesting people who love their trees. Unexpectedly finding a new tree when not really looking for one is always exciting.”
~Scott Wade, Pennsylvania big-tree coordinator

 

Meet Scott and learn about Pennsylvania’s Champion Tree Program.