Forest Files in July

IN THIS ISSUE

Protecting Wildlife

Threats to Wildlife

Recreation and Wildlife

Capturing Wildlife

STANDING TALL: New Kid on the Block


Protecting Wildlife

Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Today, 556 wildlife refuges are protecting our feathered, furry, slimy and scaly friends and preserving their habitats across the U.S. Over the years, we’ve teamed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System to plant trees to protect and restore wildlife habitat. But, the system is underfunded and needs new ways to save the animals.

Find out how large-scale changes could help threatened wildlife.

 

 


Threats to Wildlife

Credit: Seabamirum/Flickr

In recent years, climate change has had a major impact on a variety of bird species in Canada, causing drastic population declines. Warming temperatures have caused many of the bird’s migratory patterns to shift drastically and are causing insect populations to peak earlier in the year, leaving newly hatched birds with no food.

See what species are in trouble and other factors
that are silencing Canada’s birds.

 

 


Recreation and Wildlife

Credit: Ron Wu

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge along the eastern shore of Maryland is home to an abundance of wildlife — and offers lots of recreation for human visitors. You can immerse yourself in three kayak paddling trails, ride your bicycle through the scenic refuge, take a hike along one of the trails or enjoy the day taking photos and bird watching.

Explore this Maryland refuge.

 

 


Capturing Wildlife

Credit: John Hyde

From close encounters with killer whales to bears, nature photographer John Hyde has learned the importance of respect when working with nature and wildlife. For years, he created an understanding with a roaming wolf that went far past finding that perfect shot. He says, “The message is that we are all in this together; in the end, we are one and the same.”

Discover what makes this photographer click.

 

 


STANDING TALL: New Kid on the Block

Credit: Kelly Washburn

Due to wildfires in New Mexico over the last year, many of the state’s champions have been threatened. The new state coordinator is working hard to track and record the trees damaged by fire, while enjoying the wonder of big trees.

“Anytime I’m outside, I’m looking at trees and for big trees! In fact, sometimes it’s a curse. It’s something that as a forester, particularly an urban forester, you simply cannot turn off.”
~Kelly Washburn, New Mexico big tree state coordinator

Uncover more about Washburn’s “big” plans for New Mexico’s trees.