Forest Files in April

IN THIS ISSUE

Happy Earth Month!

Protecting Our Drinking Water

It’s a Bird!

Regrowing a Forest

STANDING TALL: Farewell to a Champion


Happy Earth Month!

Earthy Day 2010

Credit: American Forests

Earth Day began in 1970, and 42 years later, it’s still going strong with a month-long celebration of our planet. Here at American Forests, we like to celebrate our nation’s forests and trees daily, but in honor of Earth Month, we’re launching a few special projects, including the Spring 2012 edition of the National Register of Big Trees.

Find out how American Forests is celebrating Earth Month.

 

 

 


Protecting Our Drinking Water

Mendocino National Forest

Credit: USFS Region 5/Flickr

We talk frequently about how more than 50 percent of America’s drinking water comes from forests, but did you know that 40 percent of that water comes from watersheds in national forests and grasslands? That’s why the USDA Forest Service is making analysis of and restoration for watersheds on their lands a priority.

Discover how watershed health and forests are linked.

 

 

 


It’s a Bird!

American white pelican

Credit: Manjith Kainickara/Flickr

Where there are forests and trees, birds are likely nearby, and springtime is a prime time for bird spotting across the country. Where can you go to witness some of the country’s rarest species? From Maine to California, take your pick from this list of some of the top birding spots in the country.

Journey to America’s top birding spots.

 

 

 


Regrowing a Forest

Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

Credit: American Forests

One of California’s worst fire seasons left many forests denuded of trees and life. Almost a decade later, the ecosystems are still recovering, but innovative restoration projects, like this one in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, are helping bring the forests back to life.

Uncover the groundbreaking work happening in Cuyamaca.

 

 

 


STANDING TALL: Farewell to a Champion

Rio Grande Cottonwood

Courtesy: The Davey Tree Expert Company

With more than 80 national champions, Texas is one of the top five states in the country to see big trees, but last year, one of the state’s many devastating fires claimed a cottonwood that had been a champion since 1976.

“We lose a champion in my Trans-Pecos region every now and then to a variety of natural forces: lightning, wind, insects, disease or drought. But losing this big tree to this big wildfire is somehow more personal.”
~Oscar S. Mestas, regional urban forester, Texas Forest Service

Remember the Rio Grande Cottonwood with Oscar.