Year of Project: 2000
Trees Planted:10,000

This USFWS project will plant an additional 10,000 containerized longleaf pine, a total of about 20 acres, in numerous small natural openings and larger areas created by … Read More

Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge II

Year Planted: 2000
Trees Planted: 10,000
Location: Georgia

This USFWS project will plant an additional 10,000 containerized longleaf pine, a total of about 20 acres, in numerous small natural openings and larger areas created by fire or logging over the Refuge’s 33,000 acres of upland forest. The goal is to reestablish and expand the endangered longleaf pine and wiregrass communities. Partners include the US Fish & Wildlife Service, volunteers and Meeks Farm. The project was originally scheduled for 1999 but delays were caused by El Nino flooding. Planting actions were eventually completed in 2000.


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Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge II

Year Planted: 2000
Trees Planted: 10,000
Location: Georgia

This USFWS project will plant an additional 10,000 containerized longleaf pine, a total of about 20 acres, in numerous small natural openings and larger areas created by fire or logging over the Refuge's 33,000 acres of upland forest. The goal is to reestablish and expand the endangered longleaf pine and wiregrass communities. Partners include the US Fish & Wildlife Service, volunteers and Meeks Farm. The project was originally scheduled for 1999 but delays were caused by El Nino flooding. Planting actions were eventually completed in 2000.



Related ReLeaf Projects


Atlanta Seedling Restoration Projects
Paulding Wildlife Management Area Longleaf Pine Restoration
South Peachtree Creek and Veterans Hospital Restoration

Ways to Engage


  • Global ReLeaf On LooseLeaf Blog
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  • Act Now
    Urge Congress to introduce comprehensive legislation addressing these ecosystems and the issues they face
     
  • Donate Now
    Every dollar counts for our endangered western forests.