Year of Project: 1999
Trees Planted:270,000

The Glacierland RC&D planted 100 acres of acorns in 1998 and 1999 in Northeast Wisconsin. Acorns were planted in eight counties, including land which belongs to the Onei… Read More

Nuts Over Trees- Glacierland RC&D

Year Planted: 1999

Trees Planted: 270,000
Location: Wisconsin

The Glacierland RC&D planted 100 acres of acorns in 1998 and 1999 in Northeast Wisconsin. Acorns were planted in eight counties, including land which belongs to the Oneida Nation, and most of the acres planted were areas of high erosion. Acorns were planted because at the time of the project trees weren’t competitively priced for large plantings and the Wisconsin State nursery stock was at its limits in terms of growing capacity. This project also wanted to investigate whether or not acorn planting is a viable option when restoring forests. Acorn planting instead of tree seedlings additionally creates a more natural appearance for a forest. Field tours were given of the sites and other events featuring the acorn planting were provided in order to education others. Support for this project was also provided by the DNR, Society of American Foresters, Wild Turkey Federation, Conservation Corps, Wisconsin Land Conservation Departments, USDA, Turkey Stamp Funds and the US Forest Service.


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Nuts Over Trees- Glacierland RC&D

Year Planted: 1999
Trees Planted: 270,000
Location: Wisconsin

The Glacierland RC&D planted 100 acres of acorns in 1998 and 1999 in Northeast Wisconsin. Acorns were planted in eight counties, including land which belongs to the Oneida Nation, and most of the acres planted were areas of high erosion. Acorns were planted because at the time of the project trees weren't competitively priced for large plantings and the Wisconsin State nursery stock was at its limits in terms of growing capacity. This project also wanted to investigate whether or not acorn planting is a viable option when restoring forests. Acorn planting instead of tree seedlings additionally creates a more natural appearance for a forest. Field tours were given of the sites and other events featuring the acorn planting were provided in order to education others. Support for this project was also provided by the DNR, Society of American Foresters, Wild Turkey Federation, Conservation Corps, Wisconsin Land Conservation Departments, USDA, Turkey Stamp Funds and the US Forest Service.



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Spruce Grouse Project
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The Hardwood Forestry Fund, in partnership with Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, will reforest a 26-acre area within the Kettle Moraine State Forest. This area is known for its unique landsc

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