Year of Project: 2000
Trees Planted:279,850

The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge planted 280,760 trees in 2000 in the first phase of a three year project. The site had been clearcut and was not regenera… Read More

Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge #1

Year Planted: 2000

Trees Planted: 279,850
Location: Virginia

The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge planted 280,760 trees in 2000 in the first phase of a three year project. The site had been clearcut and was not regenerating due to the massive size of the clearcut area. The land surrounding the refuge is quickly being encroached upon by human expansion and restoration of the site is crucial for the long-term viability of black bear, southeastern short-tailed shrew (an endangered species) and other refuge wildlife populations. Additional funding for this project was awarded by Ducks Unlimited, Virginia Dept. of Forestry, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Natural Resources Conservation Service and Alligator River, PeeDee, Roanoke and Eastern Shore National Wildlife Refuges.


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Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge #1

Year Planted: 2000
Trees Planted: 279,850
Location: Virginia

The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge planted 280,760 trees in 2000 in the first phase of a three year project. The site had been clearcut and was not regenerating due to the massive size of the clearcut area. The land surrounding the refuge is quickly being encroached upon by human expansion and restoration of the site is crucial for the long-term viability of black bear, southeastern short-tailed shrew (an endangered species) and other refuge wildlife populations. Additional funding for this project was awarded by Ducks Unlimited, Virginia Dept. of Forestry, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Natural Resources Conservation Service and Alligator River, PeeDee, Roanoke and Eastern Shore National Wildlife Refuges.



Related ReLeaf Projects


North River Oak Restoration
Bluemont Junction Greenway
Fridley Gap Trout Stream Restoration
Project entails planting 240 seedlings in a restoration attempt at Fridley Gap, George Washington National Forest, Virginia. The goal of this project is to restore ecosystem function to Fridley Run,

Ways to Engage


  • Global ReLeaf On LooseLeaf Blog
    Read recent posts on related topics
     
  • Act Now
    Urge Congress to introduce comprehensive legislation addressing these ecosystems and the issues they face
     
  • Donate Now
    Every dollar counts for our endangered western forests.