Year of Project: 1996
Trees Planted:28,000

In 1994 the Forest Service purchased a 69 acre tract of land from the Alabama Nature Conservancy, who had acquired it earlier because it contained a charging area for the… Read More

Conecuh National Forest – Compartment 70 (Cave Tract)

Year Planted: 1996

Trees Planted: 28,000
Location: Alabama

In 1994 the Forest Service purchased a 69 acre tract of land from the Alabama Nature Conservancy, who had acquired it earlier because it contained a charging area for the cave known to be the habitat for the Indiana Gray Bat, an endangered species. Multiple use goals have been established for the area including special protective measures for the cave. On 32 acres of the upland sandhill ecosystem 28,000 longleaf pine will be planted while another 32 acres will remain in upland hardwoods. The acreage of longleaf pine ecosystem has been in serious decline, resulting in decreases in associated species such as the gopher tortoise. In turn, the threatened Eastern indigo snake depends on gopher tortoise burrows for food and shelter. Restoring longleaf pine along with prescribed burning as a management tool will benefit these species. Partnership with a local junior college and an elementary school will enhance their educational experience as they use the area as a ‘hands-on’ outdoor classroom.


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Conecuh National Forest - Compartment 70 (Cave Tract)

Year Planted: 1996
Trees Planted: 28,000
Location: Alabama

In 1994 the Forest Service purchased a 69 acre tract of land from the Alabama Nature Conservancy, who had acquired it earlier because it contained a charging area for the cave known to be the habitat for the Indiana Gray Bat, an endangered species. Multiple use goals have been established for the area including special protective measures for the cave. On 32 acres of the upland sandhill ecosystem 28,000 longleaf pine will be planted while another 32 acres will remain in upland hardwoods. The acreage of longleaf pine ecosystem has been in serious decline, resulting in decreases in associated species such as the gopher tortoise. In turn, the threatened Eastern indigo snake depends on gopher tortoise burrows for food and shelter. Restoring longleaf pine along with prescribed burning as a management tool will benefit these species. Partnership with a local junior college and an elementary school will enhance their educational experience as they use the area as a 'hands-on' outdoor classroom.



Related ReLeaf Projects


South Sandy Watershed Restoration Stewardship
Habitat Trees for Dothan
In 2008 the Katrina ReLeaf Fund helped to plant trees for Habitat for Humanity homes in the Dothan Diamond Grove neighborhood in Alabama. Four trees per home were provided for 14 houses, which totals
Talladega National Forest Longleaf Pine Restoration II
This project is a combination of fire rehabilitation, watershed restoration, and ecosystem restoration on sites where the current Loblolly Pine has experienced the ravaging effects of pathogens and in

Ways to Engage


  • Global ReLeaf On LooseLeaf Blog
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    Urge Congress to introduce comprehensive legislation addressing these ecosystems and the issues they face
     
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