Year of Project: 1998
Trees Planted:205,560

Blackwater River State Forest was acquired in the early 1930s by the U.S. Government as a land-use project. It was later deeded to the State of Florida. It is Florida’s l… Read More

Blackwater River State Forest V

Year Planted: 1998

Trees Planted: 205,560
Location: Florida

Blackwater River State Forest was acquired in the early 1930s by the U.S. Government as a land-use project. It was later deeded to the State of Florida. It is Florida’s largest state forest and a true multiple-use forest with timber management, recreation, and wildlife management all playing important roles. Blackwater contains one of the largest stands of longleaf pine remaining in the United States. The Division of Forestry planned to convert thousands of acres of slash pine plantations back to longleaf pine. The magnificent virgin longleaf pine forest of the Southeastern United States has been depleted to a mere 5% of its original acreage. It has truly become an endangered ecosystem, and it appears that its sole chance for continuing to exist is through its perpetuation on public lands. In the latest stage of this multi-year restoration project The Division of Forestry planted 205,560 seedlings on 300 acres.


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Blackwater River State Forest V

Year Planted: 1998
Trees Planted: 205,560
Location: Florida

Blackwater River State Forest was acquired in the early 1930s by the U.S. Government as a land-use project. It was later deeded to the State of Florida. It is Florida's largest state forest and a true multiple-use forest with timber management, recreation, and wildlife management all playing important roles. Blackwater contains one of the largest stands of longleaf pine remaining in the United States. The Division of Forestry planned to convert thousands of acres of slash pine plantations back to longleaf pine. The magnificent virgin longleaf pine forest of the Southeastern United States has been depleted to a mere 5% of its original acreage. It has truly become an endangered ecosystem, and it appears that its sole chance for continuing to exist is through its perpetuation on public lands. In the latest stage of this multi-year restoration project The Division of Forestry planted 205,560 seedlings on 300 acres.



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Ways to Engage


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