Year of Project: 2000
Trees Planted:139,500

In the Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge, American Forests, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Environmental Synergy Inc., planted bottomland hardwoo… Read More

Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge

Year Planted: 2000

Trees Planted: 139,500
Location: Louisiana

In the Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge, American Forests, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Environmental Synergy Inc., planted bottomland hardwood trees on soybean plantations that had been converted from wetlands in the 1970’s. Located just 10 miles from the banks of the Mississippi River, tree planting in this area will help enhance the overall water quality of the river. Reestablishing the native bottomland hardwood forest will additionally benefit neotropical birds by providing safe migration routes, stopover points, and breeding habitat, as well as providing wintering ground and breeding habitat for the waterfowl. Reforestation of the bayou will also directly benefit the Louisiana black bear, an endangered species, by extending their range and filling in the gaps in the fragmenting habitat.


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Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge

Year Planted: 2000
Trees Planted: 139,500
Location: Louisiana

In the Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge, American Forests, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Environmental Synergy Inc., planted bottomland hardwood trees on soybean plantations that had been converted from wetlands in the 1970's. Located just 10 miles from the banks of the Mississippi River, tree planting in this area will help enhance the overall water quality of the river. Reestablishing the native bottomland hardwood forest will additionally benefit neotropical birds by providing safe migration routes, stopover points, and breeding habitat, as well as providing wintering ground and breeding habitat for the waterfowl. Reforestation of the bayou will also directly benefit the Louisiana black bear, an endangered species, by extending their range and filling in the gaps in the fragmenting habitat.



Related ReLeaf Projects


Louisiana Bottomlands Hardwood Restoration
Bicentennial Louisianna Tree Restoration Project
Acorns of Hope
In November 2007, Tim Womick cycled 250 miles across Southern Louisiana. On his way Tim handed out 18 historic live oak trees to schools in Louisiana, including Angel Live Oaks, Jean Lafitte Live Oak

Ways to Engage


  • Global ReLeaf On LooseLeaf Blog
    Read recent posts on related topics
     
  • Act Now
    Urge Congress to introduce comprehensive legislation addressing these ecosystems and the issues they face
     
  • Donate Now
    Every dollar counts for our endangered western forests.