Year of Project: 2004
Trees Planted:15,000

Decades of timber extraction, agricultural intensification, and residential development have damaged riparian habitats in the Applegate basin. In particular, the abundan… Read More

Applegate Watershed Restoration #6

Year Planted: 2004

Trees Planted: 15,000
Location: Oregon

Decades of timber extraction, agricultural intensification, and residential development have damaged riparian habitats in the Applegate basin. In particular, the abundance and diversity of species in native biotic communities has declined. To mitigate this damage, 21,000 hardwoods were planted in 2004 and 2006 on riparian properties near the affected areas. In 2004 planting took place at the Ellis Farm and in 2006 planting took place on 30 private properties. In addition, exotic blackberry plants were removed and riparian fences were installed to keep livestock out of riparian areas. The planting of riparian buffers will reduce stream temperatures and sedimentation, improve water quality and stream habitat and provide contiguous migratory routes for wildlife and nesting habitats for birds. Partners in this project include the Bureau of Land Management, Oregon State University Extension Service, Williams Creek Watershed Council, Southern Oregon Fly Fishers and many volunteers.


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Applegate Watershed Restoration #6

Year Planted: 2004
Trees Planted: 15,000
Location: Oregon

Decades of timber extraction, agricultural intensification, and residential development have damaged riparian habitats in the Applegate basin. In particular, the abundance and diversity of species in native biotic communities has declined. To mitigate this damage, 21,000 hardwoods were planted in 2004 and 2006 on riparian properties near the affected areas. In 2004 planting took place at the Ellis Farm and in 2006 planting took place on 30 private properties. In addition, exotic blackberry plants were removed and riparian fences were installed to keep livestock out of riparian areas. The planting of riparian buffers will reduce stream temperatures and sedimentation, improve water quality and stream habitat and provide contiguous migratory routes for wildlife and nesting habitats for birds. Partners in this project include the Bureau of Land Management, Oregon State University Extension Service, Williams Creek Watershed Council, Southern Oregon Fly Fishers and many volunteers.



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