Year of Project: 1998
Trees Planted:24,065

24,065 trees were planted on the property of over 100 private landowners in the Applegate River watershed in Oregon by the Bureau of Land Management and the Applegate Riv… Read More

Applegate Watershed Restoration #2

Year Planted: 1998

Trees Planted: 24,065
Location: Oregon

24,065 trees were planted on the property of over 100 private landowners in the Applegate River watershed in Oregon by the Bureau of Land Management and the Applegate River Watershed Council. This project was needed to restore riparian zones degraded due to flooding in January 1997, grazing, logging and residential development. In particular, it was evident after the flood that highly vegetated riparian ares withstood potential flood damage better than non-vegetated areas. Propagated seedlings and rooted cuttings were outplanted on public and private lands by sponsored contractors and some volunteers. Individual site plans were developed for each landowner to insure the planting of the most adaptable and appropriate plant species and amounts. Benefits from this partnership venture are shade for waterways, reduced erosion and sedimentation, improved water quality and fish habitat, increased riparian wildlife habitat, education for landowners and increased public participation.


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Applegate Watershed Restoration #2

Year Planted: 1998
Trees Planted: 24,065
Location: Oregon

24,065 trees were planted on the property of over 100 private landowners in the Applegate River watershed in Oregon by the Bureau of Land Management and the Applegate River Watershed Council. This project was needed to restore riparian zones degraded due to flooding in January 1997, grazing, logging and residential development. In particular, it was evident after the flood that highly vegetated riparian ares withstood potential flood damage better than non-vegetated areas. Propagated seedlings and rooted cuttings were outplanted on public and private lands by sponsored contractors and some volunteers. Individual site plans were developed for each landowner to insure the planting of the most adaptable and appropriate plant species and amounts. Benefits from this partnership venture are shade for waterways, reduced erosion and sedimentation, improved water quality and fish habitat, increased riparian wildlife habitat, education for landowners and increased public participation.



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Ways to Engage


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