Category Archive: Global ReLeaf

To Track A Killer

By Katrina Marland Species, that is. Invasive species are a big problem. They wreak havoc in our native ecosystems, result in massive losses of biodiversity and cost the U.S. billions of dollars every year. Some species are fairly obvious, such as the recently-publicized pythons in the Everglades, while others can be so subtle that you […]

Budgeting for the Environment

President Obama released the Fiscal Year 2013 budget on Monday. American Forests has been working on budget recommendations as part of a Green Budget coalition. The Green Budget is a report that highlights the environmental and conservation communities’ Fiscal Year 2013 national funding priorities, such as: wildlife habitat restoration, clean energy investment. It’s prepared annually by […]

Roses Are Red, But Not Green

By Michelle Werts Happy February 14th! So much to celebrate on this day: love, statehoods and a certain blogger’s birthday. Let’s start with the most ubiquitous of today’s celebrations. Valentine’s Day This heart-covered holiday’s history is shrouded in mystery and uncertainty. Is it honoring St. Valentine … and which one? Is it related to Lupercalia, […]

Transforming Forests

By Katrina Marland Thousands of years ago, central Africa’s Congo rainforest was much larger than it is today. Eventually, large sections of the forests were replaced by savannah and grassland. For a long time, scientists attributed this change entirely to the era’s climate growing warmer and drier, but a recent paper asserts that humans may […]

The Frozen Forest

By Michelle Werts Sometimes amidst all of the worrisome environmental news, it’s nice to be able to step back and just revel in beauty every once and awhile. So revel we shall in this time-lapse video showcasing the frozen winter forestland of Burleigh Falls and Fenelon Falls, Ontario, which was shot last month by Ben […]

Sounding It Out

By Katrina Marland You’re watching a movie. The leading characters are out in the woods, hiding from some monster or another, and all of a sudden everything goes silent. No birds chirping, leaves rustling or twigs snapping — all of it stops, and you know something bad is about to happen. Turns out, this isn’t […]

Bargain in the Bayou

It can be hard to turn down a two-for-one deal. But this kind of bargain isn’t just benefitting your wallet; it can benefit the environment too! A new methodology tool has been developed to help restore wetlands along the Gulf Coast while also establishing the grounds for a carbon offset market. Tierra Resources, a small […]

Beyond the Cape

By Michelle Werts In 1788 on this date, Massachusetts became our sixth “state” — it’s technically one of four commonwealths in the United States. Despite being one of America’s smallest states by land area, Massachusetts still boasts 11 national wildlife refuges, whose habitats include wetlands, forests, marshes, bogs and savannas. So much diversity in such […]

The Rainmakers

By Katrina Marland If you follow environmental science at all, you already know that there’s a lot more we don’t know about how nature works than we actually do. When a new theory is introduced, I’m always interested because there’s that chance that it will explain some mystery people have been wondering about for ages […]

Wonderful Wetlands

By Michelle Werts Today is World Wetlands Day. For more than a decade, countries around the world have celebrated wetlands on February 2 in remembrance of the 1971 signing of the Convention of Wetlands in Ramsar, Iran. Why do we celebrate wetlands every year? Where to begin? Wetlands is the broad term used to describe […]