Category Archive: Blog


History of the Longleaf Pine

By Lisa Swann When settlers first came to what is now the southeastern U.S., they were greeted by vast pine forests — the southern longleaf pine. They noticed its spirituality, its majesty, its wildlife and its old growth trees often leaning to one side with weight. Naturalist John Muir spent time there observing these great […]

The Arbor Advisor

Each year, the International Society of Arborists (ISA) recognizes several arborists as “True Professionals of Arboriculture” for their unique contributions to the field. These arborists do not limit themselves to tree care, but also work to educate and reach out to the local community about the importance of urban forests. As the New Year draws […]

Season’s Eatings

By Marcelene Sutter Have you ever wondered where the tradition of Thanksgiving turkey came from? Perhaps we owe this delicious custom to the way that we used to eat — seasonally. Before buying locally and eating seasonally became trendy, they were simply a way of life. It makes sense: Greens were popular in the spring, […]

President Kennedy and the National Forests

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. Much of the coverage and retrospective articles you have no doubt seen cover the events of that Friday, November 22, 1963. Others focus on the Cuban missile crisis and his interactions with the former Soviet Union. But for […]

Putting Pheromones to Work

You might expect to find a blog post about how to use pheromones to their full potential on a dating blog, but we’re not talking about human pheromones. We’re talking about beetles. At American Forests, we’ve been using a synthetic version of the pheromone verbenone to repel the destructive mountain pine beetle from whitebark pine. […]

A Tree and a Recipe

By Lisa Swann Found from the Great Plains eastward and from Georgia to Massachusetts, the black walnut tree prefers rich floodplain soil and usually associates with other hardwoods such as maple, elm and sycamore.  Considered somewhat rare, its wood is used for furniture and gun stock. Some thieves have caught on to its value and […]

The True Cost of Forest Fires

By Marcelene Sutter As the world warms up, the struggle to raise the money to fight increasingly intense and more frequent forest fires continues. The rise in temperatures is causing trees to dry out, and fire-prone areas are already feeling the effects. Wildfires are burning stronger and longer, and the government is struggling to provide […]

Good News for the Bay

In the 23 years since amendments to the Clean Air Act imposed regulations on emissions of nitrogen oxide from power plants, nitrogen deposits in nine Chesapeake Bay area watersheds have declined 34 percent, according to a new study from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, published last month in Environmental Science and Technology. […]

105 Years of Zion National Park

By Lisa Swann Zion National Park in southwestern Utah is celebrating its 105th anniversary tomorrow, and there is a lot to celebrate! With deep, sandstone canyons, pinyon-juniper and conifer woodlands, hanging gardens and waterfalls, the park is a delight to visitors. Some 207 types of birds can be found in the park. This rich tapestry […]

Trout in Trouble

By Marcelene Sutter Fishing is a fond memory for many of us, whether you spent childhood summers fishing with friends, or enjoy bonding with your children or grandchildren on fishing trips. Fishing for many in the American West means one thing: trout. The trout is iconic in this region, especially in Montana, where the cutthroat […]