Category Archive: Blog


Trees and Weatherization

By John-Miguel Dalbey The end of winter doesn’t officially come until March 21, and as Winter Storm Wiley proved in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic, cold temperatures and heavy snowfall can still trigger tree-related problems and fixes. This winter’s major snow events, high winds and cold temperatures have many people turning their attention to “weatherizing” their […]

It’s Back! Big Tree Madness 2014

It’s back, bigger and madder than ever! Big Tree Madness 2014 kicks off today, giving visitors to American Forests’ Facebook page the chance to vote for which national champion tree should be this year’s Ultimate Big Tree. Today’s match-up, the first of the Sweet Sixteen, is between Connecticut’s “Unbelievable” Umbrella Magnolia and Virginia’s Willow “WOW!” […]

Keeping Wildlife and People SAFE

By Alexandra Bower With over 7 billion people living on this earth, it’s little wonder we would have a negative effect on our environment. Climate change is one of these negative effects that we have exacerbated by emitting high levels of carbon into the atmosphere daily, through deforestation and by altering our land-uses. In recent […]

Badger Culls Deemed Ineffective

By John-Miguel Dalbey In a recent analysis issued by Britain’s Independent Expert Panel, badger culls recently conducted in the Gloucestershire and Somerset regions were deemed ineffective and inhumane. Badgers had been deemed possible carriers of bovine tuberculosis, and the culls were conducted in order to prevent the disease’s spread to local cattle. Farming groups hired […]

Lemurs and Ecotourism

By John-Miguel Dalbey Lemurs are one of the most endangered groups of primates — even vertebrates — in the world, with over 90 percent of lemur subspecies listed as endangered or critically endangered by the IUCN. There are 101 species of lemur, found only in Madagascar, further divided into 15 genera and five families. The species […]

Climate Change and Crime

By John-Miguel Dalbey While the famed rule of thumb in statistics is that “correlation does not imply causation,” a recent article published in the LA Times suggests some very interesting correlations, citing a study in this week’s issue of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management conducted by Matthew Ranson, a researcher from Cambridge, Massachusetts. […]

Stopping Deforestation, Helping Business

By John-Miguel Dalbey A recent interview published in E&E News suggests that practices which prevent deforestation may actually be good for business. Unilever, an international umbrella corporation headquartered in London, recently joined the 2013 Commitment to Development “Ideas in Action.” CEO Paul Polman, in the same E&E News interview from February 12, argues that such […]

A Stitch in Time

Why do today what you can put off until tomorrow? That saying resonates with many of us; we’re a species that likes to procrastinate. But there may be more wisdom in the old adage, “a stitch in time saves nine.” It might seem like common sense that prevention is better than trying to fix problems […]

Reducing the Urban Heat Island Effect

By John-Miguel Dalbey The urban heat island effect, in which darkly colored construction materials such as asphalt and tar shingles absorb heat and make their urban surroundings warmer, has been well documented for years. However, a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that refitting buildings with white-painted roofs or […]

Water Availability

By John-Miguel Dalbey The recent drought sweeping the nation’s west has many experts questioning where the U.S. will be acquiring new sources of fresh water in the near future. According to a recent survey of over 600 scientists and environmental policymakers, the results of which were published in the journal BioScience, the issue of water […]