Category Archive: Blog


Top Dogs in Decline

Last week, in honor of the birthday of one of the greats of conservation history, Aldo Leopold, I found myself drawn into his correspondence with Ovid Butler, editor here at American Forests (then known as the American Forestry Association) throughout much of the mid-20th century. The two wrote many letters back and forth about the […]

The Fruit of Insects’ Labor

The recent crisis of “colony collapse,” in which bee colonies have been dying off due to disease, pesticides and other man-made causes, has already begun to have detrimental effects on both fruit farmers and the pollination of natural tree species. It is possible to artificially pollinate both wild and farmed trees, or allow for wind […]

The Beauties and Bounties of Nature

Sunday the birthday of John Aston Warder, founder and first president of the oldest conservation nonprofit in the country … You guessed it, American Forests. Warder was born in 1812 near Philadelphia and enjoyed a childhood of wandering the woods observing the plants and animals there. As a young man, he enjoyed fulfilling careers in […]

A Beetle’s Northward March

You have no doubt heard by now the story of the mountain pine beetle devastating hundreds of thousands of acres of forests in the western U.S. A similar tale is playing out in the mid-Atlantic, as the southern pine bark beetle has taken hold in the vast and dense New Jersey pinelands. About the size […]

Conservationist, Philosopher, Writer: Aldo Leopold

I’d like to take a moment to belatedly celebrate the anniversary of the birth of one of conservation’s most influential figures, Aldo Leopold, who would have turned 127 over the weekend. Leopold was a conservationist, forester and philosopher. He was also a father of five and raised his children with the same values of wildlife-friendly […]

Video Break: Grizzly Bears

It’s break time! Take a 60-second time-out to watch these adorable grizzly bears — and learn about the threat to their food supply and how you can help.

Snow and Ash

Unless you’ve had your head in the clouds, you know that much of the country is experiencing unusually cold temperatures. Minnesota recently experienced a sub-zero temperature plunge so severe that school was cancelled — a rare occurrence in a state that is no stranger to cold winters. One positive effect of this arctic blast is […]

The Mystery of Utah’s Eagle Deaths

The national symbol of the United States: a bird with a six to seven-foot wingspan and the largest nest of any bird in North America. The bald eagle’s majesty has inspired people for generations. American Forests has worked with the Forest Service since 2007 to restore habitat for bald eagles in several Midwest national forests […]

100 Years of an Iconic Park

Rocky Mountain National Park, established in 1915, will begin celebrating its 100th anniversary later this year, so it’s a perfect year to visit. The park was created to showcase the majesty of the Rocky Mountains, with nearly 250,000 acres of the park designated as a wilderness area. Within two hours of Denver, Colo., the park […]

Winter Sunrise

We just love this photograph by Charles Knowles of an inlet to Idaho’s Payette Lake at sunrise. We all have things to do and places to be, but don’t forget to stop and enjoy the winter. In the words of Robert Frost: Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the […]