Category Archive: Big Tree

Defenders of the Coasts

There is a silent army out there protecting our coasts from invasion — a second Coast Guard, if you will. This army has protected us not from war, but from hurricanes, floods and other catastrophes. I’m talking about coastal buffers — the mangrove forests, wetlands and oyster beds that protect us from hurricanes, floods and […]

Celebrating Simplicity

Today is the birthday of American author and naturalist Henry David Thoreau, best known for Walden, a celebration of nature and of living simply. So, today, let’s all take a moment to reflect on our own relationship with nature. Our village life would stagnate if it were not for the unexplored forests and meadows which […]

If You Protect It, They Will Come

By Michelle Werts The gopher tortoise. The ocelot. The red-cockaded woodpecker. The black bear. Within the last two years, American Forests Global ReLeaf projects in Florida, Texas, Alabama and Louisiana have restored forest habitat in these Gulf Coast states for each of the above listed species — alongside many more — and while we’re incredibly […]

Hot and Cold

Back in the Winter 2013 issue of American Forests magazine, we visited Harvard Forest in Petersham, Mass., where researchers are heating the soil with buried electric cables to gain some insight into how the changing climate will affect soil organisms like microbes and ants. So my interest was piqued when I read in E&E News […]

Creeping Away

About 1,700 years ago, humans first arrived on the scene on the island of Hawai’i. Since then, the island’s biodiversity has steadily declined. This is due to several factors: deforestation, humans repurposing land for agriculture and, possibly most detrimental, the introduction of non-native species. And it’s a non-native species that has put a Hawai’ian bird […]

Clearing the Air

By Michelle Werts “Air pollution is causing more deaths than HIV or malaria combined,” Kandeh Yumkella, director general of the U.N. Industrial Development Organization, told a conference in Oslo trying to work out new U.N. development goals for 2030. –The Huffington Post Green, April 9, 2013 Sometimes, when talking about air pollution, we get so […]

Conifers Under Threat

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reports that the latest update to their Red List — a database in which the world’s species are classified according to threat level — includes the first global reassessment of conifers. In addition to the shelter and food they provide for wildlife, conifers play an important […]

Beyond the Call of Duty

Along with the rest of the nation, the American Forests family mourns the loss of the brave members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots crew, who died Sunday while combatting Arizona’s Yarnell Hill Fire. In memory of this elite group of men that regularly braved dangerous conditions to prevent wildfires from destroying communities and ecosystems alike, […]

Fire in the Wildland-Urban Interface

There remains a constant tension between the ecological benefits provided by periodic wildfire and the negative impacts it can have on human populations. Most often, we hear about the devastating effect that wildfires have on people and communities, which was especially tragic over the weekend. American Forests sends our condolences to the families and friends […]

Wildlife Refuges Carry on With a Shrinking Budget

Three dollars. That is the amount of money per acre the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System has to spend to protect the 150 million acres of land under its care. In return, the 561 national wildlife refuges provide America with 34,000 jobs and an estimated $4.2 billion to local economies according […]