January 23rd, 2013 by
Credit: Bill Holmes/Flickr

Credit: Bill Holmes/Flickr

According to the U.S. Forest Service, Washington D.C., is often referred to as the “city of trees” because of its unique layout and landscapes. A huge component of the city’s urban forest is the National Mall. Millions of people visit the National Mall and its surrounding memorials and museums each year. On January 20, 2009, a whopping 1.8 million people flooded the National Mall to attend President Obama’s first inauguration, the largest attendance of any event ever in Washington, D.C. For President Obama’s second inauguration this past Monday, the crowd only totaled about 800,000. Even though that’s less than half the people from four years ago, it’s still a significant figure as far as people being in one place at the same time!

Over the years, the National Mall has seen its fair share of visitors, rallies, renovation and presidential inaugurations. The National Mall is a happening urban forest! This past summer, American Forests’ staff got to experience the National Mall with National Park Service retiree with Dr. James Sherald. We got a rundown of the history of the National Mall and how it started as part of Pierre L’Enfant’s 18th century vision for a “grand avenue” in the middle of the city. But the National Mall wasn’t always a tourist destination. Over the years, it has served as a cow pasture, a railway path and an open market. Today, it’s a tourist hot spot, where visitors can find a shady spot to rest in the sweltering D.C. summer and a shelter for urban wildlife. Over the centuries, trees have played a significant role in the National Mall’s aesthetic and appeal.

But trees on the National Mall don’t stay healthy and beautiful all on their own, especially since it’s such a high foot-traffic area. In addition to the National Park Service’s Center for Urban Ecology, several other agencies and organizations help take care of the trees on the National Mall, like the U.S. Forest Service, the District of Columbia’s Tree and Landscape Division and the Casey Trees Endowment. Together, these groups help protect the trees from pests and disease, monitor soil condition and pull together comprehensive urban forest health assessments. Whether it’s cleaning the air or hosting a presidential inauguration, urban forests sure do a lot for the community around it.