Take in your closest forest in Great Outdoors Month


by American Forests
Hiking trail through field of flowers on a hillside

By Conrad Kabbaz, Policy Intern

“Beauty is not an easy thing to measure. It does not show up in the gross national product, in a weekly paycheck, or in profit and loss statements. But these things are not ends in themselves. They are a road to satisfaction and pleasure and the good life. Beauty makes its own direct contribution to these final ends. Therefore it is one of the most important components of our true national income, not to be left out simply because statisticians cannot calculate its worth.”

It’s been 50 years since Lyndon Johnson’s iconic 1965 “Conservation and Preservation of Natural ... (Read More)




Can trees help stop crime?


by American Forests
Two rows of trees and grass in between streets in a residential area

By Deanne Buckman, Policy Intern

Certain things come to mind when we think about crime prevention: police squads, guard dogs, community watch groups. However, according to multiple studies, we should possibly also think of trees.

As a criminology student and an intern at American Forests, I was intrigued when I discovered this connection between my two areas of interest. After a little research on the topic, I found that certain theories of community crime proved helpful in understanding the relationship.

Routine activity theory — — suggests that if characteristics of a neighborhood decrease t... (Read More)




Environmental education grows future leaders in sustainability


by American Forests
A campus sustainability tour at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

Erin Sandlin, Policy Intern

Schools across the nation are “going green” by implementing carbon footprint reducing techniques such as incorporating solar power and instituting recycling and composting efforts. But do these actions really contribute to the greening of a school? What constitutes sustainable development?

Dr. Jean Kelso Sandlin, a professor at California Lutheran University and my mother, communicates in her paper, “Why ‘Greening’ the Campus has not Included the Classroom: The Challenges of Pedagogical Initiatives for Sustainability in Higher Education,” that educational institutions h... (Read More)




Celebrating 25 years of Cooperative Forestry


by American Forests

Deanne Buckman, Policy Intern

There’s an old saying that it takes a village to raise a child. On April 29, Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT); Robert Bonnie, Under Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and Tom Tidwell, Chief of the U.S. Forest Service gathered at a reception sponsored by American Forests, the Sustainable Urban Forest Coalition and many other forest advocacy groups to celebrate 25 years of cooperative forestry programs. Standing amongst all of those involved, I realized that it takes a village to raise a forest as well. As an intern, it was inspiring to see that people who may have slightly di... (Read More)




Striving to decrease nature deficit for children in urban areas


by Ian Leahy
kid in High line Park

Without a doubt, the part of urban forestry that intrigues me the most is environmental psychology – the study of how natural features impact our behavior. In both obvious and subtle ways, a growing body of research over the past couple decades has emerged that hints at just how deep this connection goes, particularly on children, and just how much further it could go if we created truly green cities teeming with healthy vegetation.

Some impacts are obvious. A study from the Landscape and Human Health Lab in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign shows that fewer symptoms of Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) ... (Read More)