October 5th, 2012 by
Champion common hackberry

Champion common hackberry in Warren County, NJ. Credit: Jonathan Carlucci

Colossal. Gigantic. Immense. Astronomical. Words seem small next to some of our nation’s biggest trees. Standing at the foot of a huge tree, the enormity of life can make your head spin. Those sudden flashes of understanding of our own smallness — of seeing ourselves as just a blip on the timeline of life — can be scary. At the same time, it’s comforting to stand witness to the enduring vastness of nature. To stand so close to something with the strength to grow from a one-inch acorn to a mighty 150-foot oak, to be a part of the same web of life as a giant sequoia whose life reaches 2,500 years back in time.

Today, the fall 2012 National Register of Big Trees has been released, recognizing more than 780 of the biggest trees of their species throughout the country. This marks the first time that the Register has been issued twice in a year. Champion trees are constantly changing, so American Forests has changed to keep up with them — and to keep up with dedicated big-tree hunters. These tree-lovers search all year round for these giants — braving high climbs, bad weather and the sting of defeat when one of their champs is dethroned.

Check out the Register to join us in following these trees’ triumphs and losses. We’re celebrating new champion trees like the California sycamore that joined the Register’s top 15 trees in terms of overall points toward championship, ranking near the mighty redwoods. But we’re also commiserating with dethroned monsters like the Goodding willow in New Mexico — which has lost its crown just shy of 20 years as champ — and mourning ancient giants like the American holly of Arlington, Virginia, which have at last, after a generation of humans have come and gone, completed their life cycle.

If reading about these trees inspires you to get more involved, you might consider hunting for big trees yourself. Visit our Big Tree section to learn more about how to nominate trees and who knows, maybe the spring Register could be your champ’s debut. With trees like these, there’s a lot of competition out there.