July 10th, 2012 by

By Michelle Werts

Last Friday marked my one-year anniversary at American Forests.

At times, it seems like I’ve been toiling away on behalf of forests for much, much longer, but at others, it feels like I’ve only just begun. Maybe this dichotomy is due to the fact that crusading for and protecting the environment is a never-ending task, but also one that is constantly evolving as new science and policies are unveiled.

Thus, I enter my second year at American Forests knowing that each day can result in new adventures of some kind. While I anticipate those unknown bright lights and shadows on the horizon, I’m also reveling in how differently I see the world and how much I’ve learned in a mere year:

  • Area burned by the B&B Complex Fire in Deschutes National Forest, Oregon, pictured in June 2012

    Area burned by the B&B Complex Fire in Deschutes National Forest, Oregon, pictured in June 2012. Credit: American Forests

    I’m much more conscience of the trees in my everyday life.
    Thank you, wonderful residents of the Virginia Square neighborhoods for taking care of the large shade trees that line my daily walk to the metro.

  • Fire-ravaged forests look devastating in person.
    It’s been almost 10 years since the B&B Complex Fires burned areas of Deschutes National Forest and Willamette National Forest, but the landscape is still mostly scorched trunks.
  • A concern for nature can intrude in the most unlikely places.
    Superheroes (specifically, members of the Avengers Initiative), if you’re going to beat each other up, do so without destroying the trees — even if they’re only CGI.
  • Seal pup

    Seal pup. Credit: Richard Child (Tuftronic10000)/Flickr

    People who work in various forest communities are some of the most passionate, articulate and intelligent individuals I’ve ever met.
    From those at national forests to those in cities around the country, these people have extremely difficult jobs, as oftentimes they’re trying to help our forests and trees on miniscule budgets.

  • Even a simple outing to a golf tournament with one’s father can lead to many sad exclamations.
    Many of the trees at the beautiful Congressional Country Club were unable to escape the wrath of last months’ derecho.
  • I never grow tired of baby animal pictures.
    See that seal pup to the right? Enough said.
  • It is really difficult to punctuate and spell common names of trees — let alone Latin names.
    Why, oh why, is there a hyphen in Douglas-fir and no space in redcedar?
  • I have so much more to discover.
    It’s a good thing I plan on being here awhile.

So, here’s to year two amidst forests and trees. Do forests and trees amaze you, too? Share how below!