March 25th, 2013 by
Northern Flicker

The northern flicker, a species of state conservation concern in Minnesota, often nests in or near urban areas. Credit: minicooper93402/Flickr

That’s the question our director of urban forests, Melinda Housholder, asks in a guest blog on the National Wildlife Federation’s Wildlife Promises blog.

To quote Melinda:

When I did field work with the National Park Service a few years ago along the National Mall, I hugged trees on a daily basis. Well, by that I mean, when checking for the DBH (diameter at breast height) of specific trees, I often had my arms wrapped around trees. Not in a uniform, I am sure it looked like I was just a visitor to D.C., taking some time out of my day to embrace the tree for a moment of gratitude. And, well, why shouldn’t I?

Why not indeed!

Go read about Melinda’s urban adventures — and about why urban forests are so important to people and wildlife — on our friends at the National Wildlife Federation’s blog.