August 17th, 2017|Tags: |0 Comments


By Doyle Irvin, American Forests

These forest-dwellers have mastered the art of blending in, relying on stealth to survive — or to hunt. Here are seven examples of master spies from every corner of the planet.

Knobbly Crab Spider

Credit: brisbaneinsects.com

The knobbly crab spider lives on the east coast of Australia. They nest inside dead tree branches and are described as slow moving and relatively timid.

The knobbly crab spider lives on the East coast of Australia. They nest inside dead tree branches and are described as slow moving and relatively timid.

Dead Leaf Mantis

The dead leaf mantis is native to Asia, but has become a common collector pet for many entomologists.

Potoo

Credit: Bart van Dorp

The potoo ranges from Argentina to Mexico, and spends all day lounging in camouflage before they hunt insects at night! These monogamous flyers lay a single spotted egg when reproducing.

Baron Caterpillar

Credit: Wohin Auswandern

The common baron caterpillar is one of the best camouflagers around. Before it becomes a more distinctive butterfly, they blend into the background in Indian and Southeast Asian forests.

Great Horned Owl

Credit: nature80020/flickr

Great horned owls are native to the Americas and are incredibly good at camouflage.

Leaf Katydid

Katydids are named for the sound they make, which sounds like “Ka-ty-did.” Their wings allow them to fly from predators.

Mossy Leaf-Tailed Gecko

The mossy leaf-tailed gecko is essentially invisible in its native forests of Madagascar. It can change its skin color to resemble its surroundings.