October 2nd, 2012 by

Last Thursday was a good day for New Mexico.

On that day, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar dedicated the 559th and 560th units of the National Wildlife Refuge System, both in New Mexico.

Fall in the bosque.

Fall in the bosque. Credit: Frank Carey/Flickr

Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge, meaning Valley of Gold, will indeed bring riches to New Mexico. These 390 acres are one of only a handful of urban national wildlife refuges in the country and the first in the Southwest. The refuge’s location just five miles from downtown Albuquerque puts it within a half hour’s drive of half of New Mexico’s population. From this prime location, Valle de Oro will provide opportunities for outdoor play and education for children and recreation for all ages. Considering that a full 38 percent of Americans were involved in wildlife-related recreation last year — and that they spent $145 billion dollars on it — it’s also expected the new refuge will be a boon for tourism in the area.

It goes without saying that humans aren’t the only ones who will benefit from the wildlife refuge. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will work to restore the native bosque forest — an ecosystem rarely seen outside the dry Southwest. In this riparian ecosystem, cottonwoods, often called the “heart of the bosque” — a play on their heart-shaped leaves — provide critical habitat for more than 500 species, from desert cottontails and beavers to porcupines and coyotes. The bosque also serves as an important stopover for migrating birds such as snow geese and sandhill cranes. For more on New Mexico’s unique bosque ecosystem, check out the American Forests feature on Albuquerque’s forest.

Willow flycatcher.

Willow flycatcher. Credit: Bill Bouton/Flickr

Down the road, other woodland species, including threatened and endangered species like the southwestern willow flycatcher and the Mexican spotted owl, will benefit from the establishment of the Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, more than 42,000 acres of land dedicated the same afternoon as Valle de Oro. Coupled with the recently established Sangre de Christo Conservation Area in Colorado, Rio Mora will create a wildlife corridor around five miles of the Mora River, ensuring protection for the Rio Mora watershed.

From natural riches to educational riches and economic riches, these wildlife refuges have the potential to bring great fortune to New Mexico. It’s a golden opportunity.