May 10th, 2016|Tags: , , |1 Comment


This post brought to you by the tree experts at Clauser Tree Care.

Trees are best known for providing us with oxygen, but they’re also beautiful living organisms that can live for thousands of years. You may be familiar with the ones planted in your neighborhood and never think much of them, but there are trees that people travel the world to see. Learn more about five of the world’s most famous trees:

  1. The Ashbrittle Yew
    Located in the heart of England’s Somerset County, the Ashbrittle Yew is estimated to be around 3,000-4,000 years old. With a girth of 38 feet, the Ashbrittle Yew is beloved by many, including the locals of the village. Rumor has it that a pre-Roman chief is buried under the mound.

    Ashbrittle-Yew

    Credit: Martin Bodman via Wikimedia Commons.

  2. General Sherman
    This giant sequoia can be found in California’s Sequoia National Park. Measuring 52,500 cubic feet, General Sherman is the largest tree in the entire world. The tree was named after Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman and is estimated to be about 2,000 years old.General Sherman
  3. Tree of Ténéré
    Formerly known as “The Most Isolated Tree in the World,” the Tree of Ténéré stood on its own for a 250-mile radius in Niger’s Sahara desert. In 1973, the tree was run over by a drunk driver, causing the trunk to snap. The tree was admired by locals, and its remains can now be found in a mausoleum at the Niger National Museum in Niamey.

    Tree of Ténéré

    Credit: Michel Mazeau via Wikimedia Commons

  4. Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi
    Brought over to Sri Lanka from India, the Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi is believed to have been planted in the Mahameghavana Park in Anuradhapura by King Devanampiyatissa in 249 BC, making it the oldest documented tree in the world. The Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi is a sacred tree, believed to have grown from the branch of the fig tree under which Buddha gained enlightenment.

    Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi

    Credit: VSL Travels via Flickr.

  5. Major Oak
    Standing in the heart of Sherwood Forest of Nottinghamshire, England, the Major Oak is believed to be the tree where Robin Hood once took shelter. The age of this English Oak is believed to be between 800-1,000 years old. Weighing an estimated 23 tons, Major Oak has a girth of 33 feet and branches that spread up to 92 feet. In 2014, Major Oak was named “England’s Tree of the Year.”

    Major Oak

    Credit: John W. Schulze via Flickr.

Trees are fascinating fixtures that can tell a story dating back to before our ancestors were even born. Pay a visit to the sites of these ancient trees to experience a larger piece of history!