Author Archive: Susan Laszewski


Farewell, Skippers

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Pollinator Week is a time to celebrate pollinators and marvel at how some of the smallest among us — bees, hummingbirds, bats and others — facilitate the reproduction dance of so many of our flowering trees. In fact, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), more than […]

Bald Eagles, From Sea to Shining … Lake

I was delighted to read in the USDA blog this month about “Bald Eagles Making a Comeback.” Anne Poopatanapong, district wildlife biologist for the San Jacinto Ranger District, writes that the pair of bald eagles she has been monitoring for 13 years in California’s Lake Hemet is doing well and has been fruitful. Since 2007, […]

The Climate Dream Team

Tomorrow is a day internationally dedicated to celebrating one of the most important ecosystems on our planet. And for once, I don’t mean forests. Tomorrow is the UN-designated World Oceans Day. But don’t worry, this doesn’t mean we won’t be talking about forests. After all, you can’t have one without the other. Yesterday, Michelle wrote […]

Third Time’s Another Charm

They say that the third time’s the charm, but when it comes to our partnership with Alcoa Foundation, we like to think the first two times were pretty charmed as well! In just two years, the Alcoa Foundation and American Forests Global ReLeaf Partnership for Trees has planted 520,000 trees, bringing the environmental benefits of […]

Where Have All the Amphibians Gone?

Amphibians are a part of many people’s childhood memories: Finding tadpoles, or “pollywogs,” in puddles; checking under logs for creepy, crawly newts; catching toads; or imitating the call of bullfrogs. Because amphibians are found in all kinds of environments, most of us can find some wherever we live. Growing up in Vermont, I was especially […]

Inspiration in the Everglades

Here at American Forests we love to celebrate birthdays, whether it’s celebrating a staff member with a generous helping of birthday cake or celebrating the “birth” of some of our nation’s most remarkable public lands. Today, another gorgeous national park celebrates its anniversary: Everglades National Park in Florida was signed into existence 66 years ago […]

Greener Green Energy

Now, here’s a scientific study Popeye would really go for: Researchers at the University of Georgia have captured energy from spinach, according to a new study published in Energy & Environmental Science. The team, led by Assistant Professor Ramaraja Ramasamy, has developed a method of syphoning off the electrons that plants create during photosynthesis, and […]

Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away

The ways in which forests safeguard our planet are endless. And yet, we read and hear so much about some of them — like forests’ role as carbon sinks in combating climate change — that others can sometimes be overlooked. A study published Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences serves as […]

Wonders Above and Below

Stalactites, stalagmites, an 89-foot column known as the Monarch and 400,000 bats. There are a lot of things Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico, which turns 73 today, is known for. When I visited last summer, I — like most visitors — headed straight for the caverns to see this underground wonderland for myself. […]

A Birthday Wish for Glacier National Park

One of the nation’s best-loved national parks celebrates its birthday tomorrow. Glacier National Park was signed into existence on May 11, 1910. Since then, its blue and green vistas have been inspiring visitors every summer. American Forests was instrumental in helping to establish the National Park System, and we still support it today. We want […]