Author Archive: Susan Laszewski


Conservationist, Philosopher, Writer: Aldo Leopold

I’d like to take a moment to belatedly celebrate the anniversary of the birth of one of conservation’s most influential figures, Aldo Leopold, who would have turned 127 over the weekend. Leopold was a conservationist, forester and philosopher. He was also a father of five and raised his children with the same values of wildlife-friendly […]

The Mystery of Utah’s Eagle Deaths

The national symbol of the United States: a bird with a six to seven-foot wingspan and the largest nest of any bird in North America. The bald eagle’s majesty has inspired people for generations. American Forests has worked with the Forest Service since 2007 to restore habitat for bald eagles in several Midwest national forests […]

Moose in the Mire: Part II

Yesterday I wrote about the alarming decline of moose populations in the Northeast, especially in Vermont and New Hampshire. There, though many factors may be at play, winter ticks seem to be a primary culprit. But the Northeast is not alone in watching their moose populations decline. It’s been happening across North America, though the […]

Moose in the Mire: Part I

In my home state of Vermont, moose sightings were a regular part of my childhood, but for today’s children they might be a rare treat. Just since 2005, the state’s moose population has nearly halved. Next door neighbor New Hampshire has seen their moose population decline by a third in recent years. The most likely […]

Monarchs on the Mind

If you’re a regular Loose Leaf reader, you know we follow monarch butterflies pretty closely. That’s not only because they’re important pollinators, forest animals and beautiful creatures — when they cluster on the branches of the oyamel fir in their winter home, they are a landscape unto themselves. It’s also because we’ve got a dog […]

Putting Pheromones to Work

You might expect to find a blog post about how to use pheromones to their full potential on a dating blog, but we’re not talking about human pheromones. We’re talking about beetles. At American Forests, we’ve been using a synthetic version of the pheromone verbenone to repel the destructive mountain pine beetle from whitebark pine. […]

Good News for the Bay

In the 23 years since amendments to the Clean Air Act imposed regulations on emissions of nitrogen oxide from power plants, nitrogen deposits in nine Chesapeake Bay area watersheds have declined 34 percent, according to a new study from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, published last month in Environmental Science and Technology. […]

Help for Witness Trees

Trees stand witness to many significant historical moments, often taking on a symbolism of resilience and hope. The witness trees that stand at the Flight 93 National Memorial are such trees. Managed by the National Park Service, this grove of hemlocks is the spot into which Flight 93 crashed on September 11, 2001, when crew […]

Bleak Bear Behavior

Images like this one have come to represent the consequences of climate change. The polar bear has become a symbol of the difficulties facing many wildlife species as their habitat continues to change at such a rate that they are often unable to adapt. In the polar bear’s case, as sea ice disappears, they are […]

Bats: Out of the Witches’ Cauldron and Into the Fire

Double, double, toil and trouble! The witches of Shakespeare’s Macbeth threw several of our forest creatures into their witch’s brew: Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog But this Halloween, some of these creatures have threats other […]