Author Archive: Susan Laszewski


A Rainbow of Global ReLeaf Projects for 2014

In its 24th year, American Forests Global ReLeaf is adding 33 new and continuing projects to the list of ways we’re helping forests around the world. And let me tell you, these projects are as diverse as the rainbow! Whether you call them red, orange or yellow, golden lion tamarins are facing a plight that […]

Take a Break, Enjoy a Tree

Let a tree brighten your day today! Here’s some inspiration to you get you started. Give me of your bark, O Birch Tree! Of your yellow bark, O Birch Tree! Growing by the rushing river, Tall and stately in the valley. -Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Fewer Beetles May Not Mean Fewer Concerns

Once the numbers came in from the U.S. Forest Service’s annual aerial survey last month, people started to feel hopeful: The mountain pine beetle was declining in Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota. In fact, the beetle infected fewer acres in Colorado in 2013 than in any year since 1998. Through our Endangered Western Forests initiative, […]

It’s Back! Big Tree Madness 2014

It’s back, bigger and madder than ever! Big Tree Madness 2014 kicks off today, giving visitors to American Forests’ Facebook page the chance to vote for which national champion tree should be this year’s Ultimate Big Tree. Today’s match-up, the first of the Sweet Sixteen, is between Connecticut’s “Unbelievable” Umbrella Magnolia and Virginia’s Willow “WOW!” […]

A Stitch in Time

Why do today what you can put off until tomorrow? That saying resonates with many of us; we’re a species that likes to procrastinate. But there may be more wisdom in the old adage, “a stitch in time saves nine.” It might seem like common sense that prevention is better than trying to fix problems […]

Southbound Snowies

I had been reading a lot this winter about the irruption of snowy owls, then, about a month ago, I saw a snowy owl myself right here in downtown Washington, D.C., perched above a parking sign with its beak tucked under its wing. Snowy owls usually stay near the Arctic Circle for breeding, often coming […]

Super Wetlands

Approximately 70 percent of Americans tuned into the Super Bowl yesterday and saw Seattle’s win, according to early estimates. But did you know that Seattle — along with the rest of the world — had another reason to celebrate yesterday? No, I’m not talking about celebrating the six more weeks of winter that Punxatawny Phil […]

Respect for Elders

Our elders offer a lot to society that younger generations may not as readily provide. They have more years of experience and wisdom to impart and rich histories to share. But our species is not the only one in which older individuals provide benefits that the young can’t always make up for. We already know […]

Top Dogs in Decline

Last week, in honor of the birthday of one of the greats of conservation history, Aldo Leopold, I found myself drawn into his correspondence with Ovid Butler, editor here at American Forests (then known as the American Forestry Association) throughout much of the mid-20th century. The two wrote many letters back and forth about the […]

The Beauties and Bounties of Nature

Sunday the birthday of John Aston Warder, founder and first president of the oldest conservation nonprofit in the country … You guessed it, American Forests. Warder was born in 1812 near Philadelphia and enjoyed a childhood of wandering the woods observing the plants and animals there. As a young man, he enjoyed fulfilling careers in […]