Author Archive: Katrina Marland


We Are the Champions

Later this month, we have something special in store for you: The spring edition of our National Register of Big Trees will be released on April 27th! In anticipation, we’ll be talking about big trees every Friday until the release of the new register. It showcases each of the biggest trees — we call them […]

An Old-Growth Fortress

This marks our first blog post in the month of April, a time known around here (and hopefully where you are, too) as Earth Month. Since this is supposed a time when everyone is more aware of the challenges facing our environment, we are going to use our Monday posts this month, plus Melinda’s regular […]

Birds on the Move

Every year around the holidays, the Audubon Society organizes the annual Christmas Bird Count, an event in which volunteers across the U.S. help take a census on the birds that appear in their regions. A new study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology has used the data from 35 years of this Christmas Bird […]

Noisy Neighbors

Mankind is a noisy animal. Far beyond the sounds we can physically make ourselves, if you consider the noise produced by all the machinery and industry around the world, humans are by far the loudest creatures on Earth. And like that obnoxious college roommate that always played their music too loud, we are driving our […]

Celebrating World Water Day

I think that we can all agree that water is pretty important. We use it in everything from manufacturing to agriculture, and then, of course, there’s that other small detail: Water is essential to life on this planet. There’s not a single living thing on Earth that doesn’t need water. Today is World Water Day. […]

A Biological Clock

Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? If you have, you know that they are nearly always followed by a terrible, dragging fatigue. For the next day, or even several days, you just don’t feel right. That is nature catching up with you. You see, the human body is only meant to function on a 24-hour […]

Working for Wildlife

Yesterday, Michelle wrote about the challenges in defining exactly what makes an animal officially endangered. It’s an important issue because that language can determine whether or not the government invests its resources in trying to save a species by taking conservation action across public lands. Here’s the problem, though: Endangered species are not found exclusively […]

A Belated Birthday

We’ve been a little extra busy this month, what with new legislation, policy conferences, fascinating scientific discoveries and just keeping up with the world of environmental news overall. But being busy is no good reason to overlook a birthday, so we’re taking a minute today to recognize some states that are another year older. First […]

A Forest of Fossils

In the world of environmental news, forests are frequent stars. They’re just too important, tied to too many wide-reaching issues to stay out of the headlines for long. Lately, however, the spotlight has been on a different type of forests: ancient ones. We’re not talking about old-growth forests or living trees that happen to be […]

Happy Birthday, Yellowstone!

Here in the U.S., we are lucky to have some truly outstanding natural places protected for our enjoyment and education. We have no fewer than 155 national forests that encompass millions of acres and 58 national parks. But one place in particular set things in motion and created a precedent for the wealth of protected […]