Author Archive: Loose Leaf Team


Forest Digest — Week of June 9

Loose Leaf is proud to introduce Forest Digest! Once a week, we will share recent forest-related news from around the world. Check out this week’s news in trees: “Tree rings give scientists information about weather conditions hundreds of years ago” — The Washington Post David W. Stahle, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geosciences at […]

Dive in to National Rivers Month

By Caroline Brooks, Communications Intern June offers us many occasions to celebrate: the end of school, the beginning of summer and, among all the season’s celebrations, National Rivers Month! All of these events encourage us to get outside and take advantage of this gift that Mother Nature has granted us. Across the country, rivers serve […]

Unnavigable Congress awaits many conservation bills

By Alexandra Bower Seeing legislation stifled in a Congress that is so gridlocked by partisanship is not cause for surprise. What about 10 conservations bills introduced and languished 52 times in the last 30 years? Surprised yet? Since 1984, 10 high-profile land conservation bills have been introduced and stifled on 52 separate occasions in the […]

Are palms truly trees?

By Sheri Shannon There certainly is a lot of healthy debate out there about whether palms are “true trees.” What constitutes a “true tree?” Does it have to be of a certain height and girth? Does the crown spread have to be the equivalent of a wide-spreading southern live oak? Trees vary in shape and […]

Cloudy, with a chance of climate change:
U.N. panel releases grim report

By Alexandra Bower The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has recently reported on the risks of climate change for the first time in seven years, and the outlook isn’t pretty. The IPCC states that the world is “ill-prepared” for the effects of a changing climate, which are only expected to worsen. From […]

Celebrating the UN’s International Day of Forests

By John-Miguel Dalbey Today is the second annual United Nations International Day of Forests. First observed as an international day on March 21, 2013, this day continues the celebration of forests begun with two previous days:  the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization’s World Forestry Day, founded in 1971, and Forest Day, convened by the […]

Trees and Weatherization

By John-Miguel Dalbey The end of winter doesn’t officially come until March 21, and as Winter Storm Wiley proved in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic, cold temperatures and heavy snowfall can still trigger tree-related problems and fixes. This winter’s major snow events, high winds and cold temperatures have many people turning their attention to “weatherizing” their […]

Keeping Wildlife and People SAFE

By Alexandra Bower With over 7 billion people living on this earth, it’s little wonder we would have a negative effect on our environment. Climate change is one of these negative effects that we have exacerbated by emitting high levels of carbon into the atmosphere daily, through deforestation and by altering our land-uses. In recent […]

Badger Culls Deemed Ineffective

By John-Miguel Dalbey In a recent analysis issued by Britain’s Independent Expert Panel, badger culls recently conducted in the Gloucestershire and Somerset regions were deemed ineffective and inhumane. Badgers had been deemed possible carriers of bovine tuberculosis, and the culls were conducted in order to prevent the disease’s spread to local cattle. Farming groups hired […]

Lemurs and Ecotourism

By John-Miguel Dalbey Lemurs are one of the most endangered groups of primates — even vertebrates — in the world, with over 90 percent of lemur subspecies listed as endangered or critically endangered by the IUCN. There are 101 species of lemur, found only in Madagascar, further divided into 15 genera and five families. The species […]