Author Archive: Loose Leaf Team


Take a Leap

By Michelle Werts Time is a fickle mistress. It’s supposed to be the one constant in life, right? It just ticks on second after second … except twice a year when we lose or gain an hour … and every four years when we all of sudden get an extra 24 hours in the form […]

Getting the Dirt on Forests

By Katrina Marland There’s a lot we still don’t know about climate change, but one thing we do know is that forests are a vital piece of the puzzle. Forests are so intertwined with carbon, and carbon with climate, that there is no denying the role forests play in slowing climate change and addressing its […]

Freezing for Maple Syrup

By Michelle Werts Have you loved this year’s unseasonable warm winter? Yes? Well, I have another question for you: Is that happiness worth the loss of maple syrup on your pancakes and waffles? While snow and freezing temperatures are cumbersome for us humanoids, they’re essential for maple-syrup producers across the country. In fact, without freezes, […]

Where There’s Smoke…

By Katrina Marland You don’t have to be a genius to know that wildfires can be very harmful. But we usually think of that damage as being contained to the forest or other areas physically touched by the fires. In reality, the consequences of a wildfire spread far beyond the reach of the flames. Effects […]

Remembering Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt

By Michelle Werts On Monday, America celebrates Presidents Day, a holiday that is specifically meant to honor our nation’s first president, George Washington, who was born on February 22, 1732. But it’s also a good time to remember many of the other men who held our nation’s office. I particularly like to celebrate the man […]

To Track A Killer

By Katrina Marland Species, that is. Invasive species are a big problem. They wreak havoc in our native ecosystems, result in massive losses of biodiversity and cost the U.S. billions of dollars every year. Some species are fairly obvious, such as the recently-publicized pythons in the Everglades, while others can be so subtle that you […]

Roses Are Red, But Not Green

By Michelle Werts Happy February 14th! So much to celebrate on this day: love, statehoods and a certain blogger’s birthday. Let’s start with the most ubiquitous of today’s celebrations. Valentine’s Day This heart-covered holiday’s history is shrouded in mystery and uncertainty. Is it honoring St. Valentine … and which one? Is it related to Lupercalia, […]

Transforming Forests

By Katrina Marland Thousands of years ago, central Africa’s Congo rainforest was much larger than it is today. Eventually, large sections of the forests were replaced by savannah and grassland. For a long time, scientists attributed this change entirely to the era’s climate growing warmer and drier, but a recent paper asserts that humans may […]

The Frozen Forest

By Michelle Werts Sometimes amidst all of the worrisome environmental news, it’s nice to be able to step back and just revel in beauty every once and awhile. So revel we shall in this time-lapse video showcasing the frozen winter forestland of Burleigh Falls and Fenelon Falls, Ontario, which was shot last month by Ben […]

Sounding It Out

By Katrina Marland You’re watching a movie. The leading characters are out in the woods, hiding from some monster or another, and all of a sudden everything goes silent. No birds chirping, leaves rustling or twigs snapping — all of it stops, and you know something bad is about to happen. Turns out, this isn’t […]