Author Archive: Loose Leaf Team


The First National Forest

By Michelle Werts Most people know that Yellowstone was America’s first national park, established back in 1872, but less well-known is the fact that Yellowstone also claims the status as our first national forest, established on March 30, 1891. There’s a national forest named Yellowstone? Not anymore … but let’s start at the beginning. For […]

Backyard Biodiversity

By Josh DeLacey “Conservation is about waiting for a long time,” says Dan Ashe, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. So, in a society that wants speed and short waits, Ashe explains, conservation too often gets neglected. Ashe was one of four plenary speakers at the 78th North American Wildlife and Natural Resources […]

Can Trees Save the Chesapeake Bay?

By Tacy Lambiase During my spring break “vacation,” I spent last week camping on the shore of the Chesapeake Bay near Annapolis, Md. With 13 of my fellow classmates from the University of Maryland’s Alternative Breaks program and a fearless staff advisor, I participated in service projects to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay, […]

Dedicate Today to Celebrating Our Forests

By Tacy Lambiase Here at American Forests, we celebrate the beauty and benefits of our Earth’s forests every day of the year. But thanks to the United Nations General Assembly, there is now an official holiday dedicated to trees around the globe. On December 21, 2012, the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution declaring March […]

ReLeaf by the Numbers

By Michelle Werts 1,888,012 trees across 5,038 acres (or 5,038 football fields if that helps you picture the size) in 25 forests in 14 states and 5 countries equals 1 healthier planet This afternoon, American Forests announced our 2013 Global ReLeaf restoration projects. As you can glean from above, these 25 projects are planting 1.8 […]

Tree News

By Tacy Lambiase Over the past week, we’ve been tracking several interesting stories related to forests and trees around the world. From wildfire season predictions to victories over an invasive insect species, here are several stories from the world of trees. Arlington Cemetery Proposes Plan That Would Cut Down Almost 900 Trees An expansion plan […]

Disappearance of the Monarch

By Michelle Werts What’s black and white and orange all over? Probably many things, but I’m thinking specifically of the monarch butterfly. Why? Because earlier this week, Mexico’s National Commission of Natural Protected Areas announced that the wintering population of the monarch butterfly declined by 59 percent this winter. The monarch — which can’t be […]

Remember the Longleaf

By Josh DeLacey When Alabama became a state in 1819, up to 90 million acres (140,000 square miles) of longleaf pine forests stretched across the southeastern United States. That’s an area almost the size of Montana — an area larger than all the national parks combined — all covered in towering pine trees. Early settlers […]

Where No Tree Has Gone Before

By Tacy Lambiase More intense wildfires, drought and drier soil — these are just some of the negative consequences of climate change that can seriously affect the health of trees. But what happens when warmer temperatures actually make certain ecosystems more hospitable for trees? According to a new study, the arctic tundra is one environment […]

The Sequestration and Conservation

By Michelle Werts A little more than a week ago, the long-dreaded budget sequestration began, which is forcing all federal agencies to make five percent budget cuts to all of their programs, activities, etc. And as we’ve all been seeing in the news, five percent might seem like a small number, but it can have […]