Author Archive: Caity Gonano


Returning to Stadium Woods

I have spent the last three months interning here at American Forests. In the next week, I will be returning to Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., to complete my senior year with a wealth of knowledge of trees, forests and the environment that I have learned in these past months. I feel like I have […]

Completion of the Appalachian Trail

Seventy five years ago today, the 2,184-mile Appalachian Trail was completed. Finishing the trail was a huge task that took more than 15 years and hundreds of volunteers. Today, though, it is unlikely that the original volunteers would even recognize it with all the transformation it has undergone over the years. In its 75-year existence, […]

The Father of Conservation

Saturday marks the birthday of Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the U.S. Forests Service. He is known as the “father of conservation” and credited for launching the conservation movement in the United States by urging Americans to preserve the past in order to protect the future. When asked by his father as a young […]

Pesky Pachyderms

When I think of elephants, big, friendly giants come to mind. This said, I would much rather prefer to enjoy the friendly giants, weighing up to 16,500 pounds and standing close to 13 feet tall, with the comfort of a fence between us. New studies show, though, that it is trees that need to worry […]

Palms From the Past

Imagine taking tropical vacations to Antarctica. While that might seem like a stretch, new studies reveal that around 52 million years ago, palm trees were growing along the edge of the now ice-covered Antarctica. On Antarctica’s eastern coast researchers drilled a kilometer deep into the ocean floor and found layers of sediment containing pollen grains […]

Volcanic Beauty

This Wednesday, marks the 96th anniversary of two of Hawaii’s most prized national parks: Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park, both of which were established decades before Hawaii was even a state. Back in 1916, only one park was actually created to represent the combination of volcanic areas on the islands of Maui […]

The Oaks Are Moving Up

In a study published in 2011, researchers found that more than half of the tree species in eastern U.S. forests are not adapting to climate change as quickly or consistently as predicted. Only about 21 percent of the species studied appeared to be shifting northward. With warmer temperature zones shifting northward, scientist expected to see […]

Thieving Rodents Save Trees

Usually, when we talk about trees and wildlife, we emphasize how important trees are to the animal’s survival. I never knew before working here that the reverse could also be true — that trees would be relying heavily on animals for their survival. New studies are revealing that small rodents known as agoutis are a […]

Safe Crossings for Wildlife

When driving down the highway, I usually find myself wincing as I pass under a bridge. The idea of 1,000-pound cars and trucks driving over me in my little car is never something that has made me comfortable. But I am not sure how I would feel looking up to find a bear or a […]

Cute, Cuddly and Endangered

July 4th marked the beginning of Panda Awareness Week (PAW) when 108 people dressed in panda suits and took London by storm by performing a choreographed tai-chi dance in the middle of Trafalgar Square. PAW was created by the Chengdu Panda Base, a nonprofit organization that currently houses 108 pandas and engages in wildlife research, […]