Author Archive: Alison Share, Environmental Public Policy Associate, Crowell & Moring LLP


Izembek Revisited: An Alaska Road to Somewhere

Last March, we discussed the burgeoning conflict between Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and the Department of the Interior over a proposed 20-mile gravel road in the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. The road would be used to link the local King Cove community to an all-weather airport. Currently, residents must use hovercrafts and boats to access […]

The Wilderness Compromise of S. 37 and Senator John Tester

While much of the media followed the ever-shifting tea leaves during the budget negotiations between Senator Patty Murray and Representative Paul Ryan, the background tug-of-war over wilderness protections continued this month. Two separate actions, a Senate bill sponsored by Senator John Tester (D-MT) and a statement of policy from the pro-logging group Federal Forest Resource […]

President Kennedy and the National Forests

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. Much of the coverage and retrospective articles you have no doubt seen cover the events of that Friday, November 22, 1963. Others focus on the Cuban missile crisis and his interactions with the former Soviet Union. But for […]

Congress Increases Funding to Fight Wildfires in Legislation to Reopen the Federal Government

Last week, at both the figurative and literal eleventh hour, Congress passed H.R. 2775 – the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014. In addition to reopening the federal government and temporarily suspending the debt ceiling, the bill also provides additional funding to several federal agencies, including the U.S. Forest Service, to assist with their ongoing operations. We […]

H.R. 1526: Limiting Judicial Review of Forest Management

These days, much of the oxygen in Washington is being consumed by speculation about whether Congress will be able to pass a continuing resolution in time to avoid a federal government shut down on October 1. But contrary to what you may hear, read or see on the news, Congress is still working and passing […]

The Politics of Fighting Fire

Last Wednesday, I traveled to San Francisco to attend a conference for work. My colleague, who traveled separately, showed me photos he had taken on his flight. The photos were of the fire currently burning in Yosemite National Park, bright and jagged slashes of orange and red against the night backdrop. All from 35,000 feet. […]

The Forest Service Assists America’s Pastime

Something special happens about mid-February every year. The days become a little less gray and a little less cold. There is promise on the wind — of warmer weather and sunnier days. If you close your eyes, you can smell the grass, hear the cheers and the crack of the bat, taste the Cracker Jacks. […]

Buffalo Soldiers in the National Parks

The House of Representatives had a busy week last week, even beyond the machinations surrounding the Farm Bill. On Monday, June 17, the House passed a raft of environmental bills, including ones addressing land exchanges, creating a new national historic trail and analyzing forest sites for potential inclusion in the National Park System. Two of […]

Logging Roads and the Clean Water Act

It doesn’t really matter what your political party affiliation is: There are times when you hear about a Supreme Court ruling, and you are left scratching your head. Whether it’s because you believed an issue was so cut and dry it is hard to imagine anyone else coming out the other way or you thought […]

The Joy of the Federal Register

Now, before you skip this post based on the title, ask yourself this: How does the U.S. Forest Service decide what paint to use to mark trees? Ever been hiking through your favorite forest and think, who decides where to put those trail blazes and why did they choose white or blue or orange? Lucky […]